Demographics in the Canterbury Area

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Before 1945 most settlers were of English, Scottish or Irish backgrounds, although there were Chinese market gardeners in the late 1800s, and the first Lebanese-born shopkeeper set up in Campsie in 1916. Many postwar migrants from Europe settled in Canterbury, particularly Greeks and Italians. The civil war in Lebanon in the 1970s saw the start of a large migration of Lebanese, of both Christian and Muslim faiths. Chinese and Korean migrants have come in large numbers since the late 1980s. Canterbury now has small but emerging communities from African and Pacific Island countries. Canterbury is distinctive for its diverse population with its high proportion of overseas born.

Ashbury

According to the 2011 Census, there were 3,134 residents in Ashbury. 63.6% of residents were born in Australia. The most common other countries of birth were Italy 6.5%, Lebanon 2.6% and China 2.4%. 57.6% of residents spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Italian 11.7%, Greek 8.2% and Arabic 4.8%. The most common responses for religious affiliation were Catholic 46.3%, No Religion 15.4% and Eastern Orthodox 12.6%. [1]

Belfield

According to the 2011 Census, there were 6,043 residents in Belfield. 56.1% of residents were born in Australia. The most common other countries of birth were Lebanon 5.4%, Korea, Republic of (South) 4.5% and China 4.0%. 41.5% of residents spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Arabic 14.1%, Italian 7.5% and Korean 6.3%. The most common responses for religious affiliation were Catholic 43.7%, Eastern Orthodox 10.7% and No Religion 9.8%.[2]

Belmore

According to the 2011 Census of Population, there were 12,574 residents in Belmore. 42.4% of residents were born in Australia, compared with the national average of 69.8%. The most common other countries of birth were Greece 6.7%, Lebanon 5.1% and China 4.7%. 25.5% of residents spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Greek 15.0%, Arabic 14.0% and Vietnamese 4.7%. The most common responses for religious affiliation were Catholic 26.7%, Eastern Orthodox 19.8% and Islam 11.5%.[3]

Beverly Hills

According to the 2011 Census of Population, there were 9,661 residents in Beverly Hills. 51.2% of people were born in Australia. The most common other countries of birth were China (excludes SARs and Taiwan) 12.5%, Hong Kong (SAR of China) 3.9% and Greece 2.5%. 39.7% of people spoke English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Cantonese 14.9%, Mandarin 9.2%, Greek 8.6%, Arabic 5.0% and Italian 2.2%. The most common responses for religious affiliation were Catholic 26.2%, No Religion 17.6%, Eastern Orthodox 12.6%, Anglican 8.6% and Buddhism 7.2%.[4]

Campsie

Campsie is a suburb of cultural diversity and currently home to a large east Asian Community. In the 2011 Census, 21,218 people lived in the suburb of Campsie. 28 per cent of them were born in Australia, 21.8% were born in China, 5.1% were born in Korea, and 4% were born in each of India, Vietnam and Lebanon. [5]

Canterbury

According to the 2011 Census, there were 6,59 residents in Canterbury. 45.6% of people were born in Australia. The most common countries of birth were China 7.1%, Greece 4.4%, Vietnam 3.2%, Lebanon 2.8% and Portugal 2.6%. In Canterbury 35.0% of people only spoke English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Greek 10.8%, Arabic 6.3%, Mandarin 5.8%, Cantonese 4.9% and Portuguese 3.9%. The most common responses for religion in Canterbury were Catholic 29.0%, No Religion 16.2%, Eastern Orthodox 14.6%, Buddhism 7.1% and Anglican 5.9%. [6]

Clemton Park

As of the 2011 Census, there were 1,565 residents in Clemton Park. In Clemton Park, 58.1% of people were born in Australia. The most common countries of birth were Greece 6.8%, China 4.7%, Portugal 3.7%, Lebanon 3.0% and Italy 2.2%. Family households (77.1%) were the main type of household, with 21.5% single person households and 1.5% group households.[6]

Croydon Park

According to the 2011 Census, Croydon Park had a population of 10,742. In Croydon Park, 56.6% of people were born in Australia. The most common other countries of birth were Italy 5.5%, China 5.3%, Lebanon 3.3%, New Zealand 1.6% and Korea, Republic of (South) 1.5%. More than half of residents spoke a language other than English at home, with the top languages being Italian 10.0%, Arabic 7.6%, Mandarin 4.8%, Cantonese 4.0% and Greek 3.9%. Catholic 43.9% was the most common response for religion in Croydon Park.[6]

Earlwood

According to the 2011 Census, there were 16,753 residents in Earlwood. 41.2% stated they were born overseas with the top countries of birth being Greece 8.7%, Italy 3.2%, China 2.9%, Portugal 2.6% and Lebanon 2.6%. English was stated as the only language spoken at home by 43.3% of residents and the most common other languages spoken were 22.0%, Arabic 6.8% and Italian 4.9%. The most common responses for religious affiliation were Catholic 33.4%, Orthodox 27.6% and No Religion 13.3%.[6]

Hurlstone Park

Kingsgrove

Lakemba

Narwee

Punchbowl

Riverwood

Roselands

Wiley Park

Wiley Park inhabited largely by Anglo Celtic residents of a working-class background. The suburb was became an increasingly multicultural suburb from the late 1970s onwards, with many residents born overseas or having parents born overseas, from countries such as Lebanon, Vietnam, Italy, Greece, the Philippines and the Pacific Islands.

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