Harcourt

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The Canterbury district was the location of the earliest model suburb in New South Wales which was named "Harcourt". It was located between Canterbury and Burwood on the 200 acre former site of Stoneless Bay Farm, previously owned by Mary Redman and purchased for 10,215 pounds.[1] This development could be seen as a forerunner of the garden city concept.[2]

The model suburb was developed by William Phillips from 1888, with subdivision plans submitted in June.[3]. The land was cleared and the nine streets were called 'Grand Avenues', using New York City in the United States as a model. They were 99 and 69 feet wide.[4]

Due to a slump in land values and other factors Phillips was forced to transfer Harcourt to the Burwood Land Building and Investment Company.[5]

The suburb no longer exists as it was largely destroyed by torrential rain in May 1889 and Phillips was convicted of fraud a few years later. The Harcourt name remains as a locality and the Harcourt Public School on First Avenue.

References

  1. Book of Sydney Suburbs, Frances Pollon (Angus and Robertson) 1990, p.48
  2. LARCOMBE, Frederick A. Change and challenge: a history of the municipality of Canterbury. [Canterbury, NSW]: Canterbury Municipal Council, 1979. p. 172
  3. LARCOMBE, Frederick A. Change and challenge: a history of the municipality of Canterbury. [Canterbury, NSW]: Canterbury Municipal Council, 1979. p. 172
  4. LARCOMBE, Frederick A. Change and challenge: a history of the municipality of Canterbury. [Canterbury, NSW]: Canterbury Municipal Council, 1979. p. 173
  5. N.K. Peek "Stoneless Bay and Harcourt", Canterbury Historical Society Journal